Footnote 325

Fasting was often adopted by the pious of that era as a way of mortifying the body. For someone living an active lifestyle, eating only "twice a day" (as Louis describes below), or eating little more than bread on occasions, would be difficult. Her even more extreme position with regard to wine was also unusual, since it must be remembered that wine was a staple of the medieval French diet, normally consumed with meals and providing needed calories and vitamins that couldn't be obtained from other sources during portions of the year. This makes her practice of drinking so very little wine all the more remarkable. Many eyewitnesses and chroniclers remarked on both subjects:

Perceval de Boulainvilliers: "... she eats moderately, consumes even less wine..." (for a transcription of the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol V, p. 120.)

Louis de Coutes: "...she was extremely sober [temperate in both drinking and eating]; several times she ate nothing but a piece of bread during the entire day; I was surprised that she ate so little. When she was in her lodging, she ate only twice a day." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 69; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 364; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 275, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 156).

"Chronique de la Pucelle": "[After she first arrived at Orléans] They had preparations made to dine well and properly; but she merely had a bit of wine poured into a silver cup which she had half filled with water, and five or six slices of soaked bread, which she ate, and she didn't eat or drink anything else all that day" (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol IV, p. 219).

A similar practice was described by two sources when she ate a small meal after being wounded a few days later:

The Count of Dunois: "she took her meal, eating four or five slices of toasted bread in heavily watered-down wine, without taking any other food or drink for the entire day."
"... she could not be surpassed by any living person when it came to sobriety" (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, pp. 9, 15; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, pp. 321, 325; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", pp. 246, 249, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", pp. 124, 127).

"Chronique de la Pucelle": "[after being wounded at Orléans]... she decided to merely have a bit of wine in a glass which she had half filled with water" [it forgets to mention the slices of bread] (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol IV, p. 231).

Guillaume de Ricarville: "she was of noble conduct, extremely sober in drinking and eating..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 22; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 329; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 252).

Lord Raoul de Gaucourt: "the aforementioned Jehanne was sober in drinking and eating, and nothing but proper speech proceeded from her mouth, serving for edification and as a good example..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 18; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 327; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 250).

Jacques Gelu, Archbishop of Embrun (in his treatise in May of 1429): "she is... temperate with regard to food" (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, pp. 406 - 407).

Colette Milet: "Jehanne was extremely sober in eating and drinking, and conducted herself decently..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 125; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 408; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 303).

An anonymous poem, included in BR 5970 along with the Rehabilitation documents, similarly notes that she drinks "little wine" (for a transcription of the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol V, p. 32).


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