Footnote 336

The 15th century accounts include:

Simon Beaucroix, who had served in her army: "She never allowed disreputable women to travel in the army with the soldiers: as a result of which none would have dared to come into Jehanne's company; but if any came she forced them to leave, unless the soldiers were willing to marry them." (For the original language, see DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, pp. 373 - 374; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 281, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 107).

Jean Pasquerel, her confessor in the army: "she ordered ... that they must take heed that no dissolute women should accompany them, because God was allowing the war to be lost as a result of such sins." (For the original language, see DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 393; ; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", pp. 293 - 294, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 164).

Duke Jean II d'Alençon, one of her commanders: "Jehanne was chaste, and she despised those women who follow soldiers [i.e., prostitutes]. Indeed, at Saint Denis when coming back from the King's coronation, I saw Jehanne, with drawn sword, chase after a certain girl who was with the soldiers, so that in charging upon her she broke her sword." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 99); DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 387; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", pp. 289 - 290, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 142).

Louis de Coutes [or "de Contes"], one of her pages: "She didn't want women to be in the army; for on one occasion, near the town of Chateau-Thierry, upon seeing a certain woman who was the lover of one of the soldiers, who was a knight, she chased the woman with drawn sword; however, she didn't strike the woman, but rather advised her kindly and charitably to not come into contact with the soldiers, otherwise she would make things unpleasant for the woman." (For the original language, see: DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 367; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 276, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 159].

Jean Chartier gives the following description of a similar incident on June 29, 1429: "And there were in the aforesaid army many fallen women who hindered some of the men-at-arms from promptly following the King; and when Jehanne saw this, after the shout went up that everyone should march forward, she drew her sword and hit two or three with it so that she broke her aforesaid sword." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol IV, p. 71).

"Journal du Siège d'Orléans": "[when the army moved out from Blois] she ordered that all the soldiers should confess, and leave behind all their immoral women..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol IV, p. 151).


Copyright © 2002 - 2003, Allen Williamson. All rights reserved.

Return to the biography.