Footnote 347

The witnesses said that she followed the usual procedure of having at least one other woman with her when in mixed company at night, and slept fully clothed or in armor if she couldn't find another woman. The relevant testimony includes the following:

Louis de Coutes: "... because she always had a woman with her while sleeping at night, if it was possible to find one; and if it was not possible, when on campaign and in camp, she slept in her clothing." (For the original language, see DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 365; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 275, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 157).

Bertrand de Poulengy: "Each night [on the route to Chinon], Jehanne lay down to sleep beside Jean de Metz and myself, wearing her surcoat and her hosen [i.e., pants], laced and secured [this refers to the fact that such clothing was designed so that the tunic and pants could be fastened together]." (For the original language, see: DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 306; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 239, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", pp. 91 - 92).

Jean de Metz: "[In the fields along the way to Chinon] She, myself and Bertrand took our rest together each night, but the Maiden slept near me, wearing her tunic and hosen..." (For the original language, see: DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 291; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 230, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 87).

"Chronique de la Pucelle": "if it so happened that she had to take her lodging in the fields with the soldiers, she never removed her armor... and when people asked her why she was clothed in male garments and rode armored, she replied that it was thus ordered to her, and that it was primarily to safeguard her chastity more easily; also because it would have been too strange a thing to see her riding in a woman's dress among so many men-at-arms." (for a transcription of the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol IV, pp. 250 - 251.)


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