Footnote 639

There are many accounts of her ability to inspire both civilians and soldiers in a variety of ways. To give but a few examples which each provide a few pieces of the whole:

Jean de Metz, one of the soldiers who escorted her to Chinon and later served in her army: "I greatly believed in the Maiden's words, and was inspired by her speech..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol II, p. 438; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 291; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 230).

Bertrand de Poulengy, another soldier in her escort: "I was greatly stirred by her statements because it seemed to me that she had been sent by God..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol II, p. 458; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 307; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 239).

Lord Thibaud de Termes, who had served in the army at Orléans while she was there, remembered that "... when exhorting [or motivating, etc] the soldiers, she conducted herself as if she were the most skilled commander in the world..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 120; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 404; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 301).

Gobert Thibaut: "[when on the route to Rheims]... Jehanne told the King and men-at-arms to go boldly, and everything would turn out successfully, and that they shouldn't fear..." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 76; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 369; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 278).

Duke Jean d'Alençon: "... then there was a dispute between the commanders, because some were of the opinion that they should make an assault on the town, others of the opposite, declaring that the English were in great numbers and strength. Jehanne, seeing the difficulties between them, said that they had nothing to fear; that they shouldn't fear any number [of troops], nor make difficulties about attacking the English, because God was overseeing their work; saying that, if she were not secure in the knowledge that God was overseeing this work, she would have preferred to watch over the sheep rather than expose herself to such perils. And having heard this, they set their route towards the town of Jargeau..." (For the original language, see DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 383; and Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, pp. 94 - 95; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 287, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 138).

Lord Guy XIV de Laval, one of the young noblemen in her army, said that "it seemed a thing completely divine... to see and hear her." (For the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol V, p. 107).

The Count of Dunois remembered that she "sometimes may have spoken jokingly about feats of arms in order to stir [motivate, etc] the soldiers...", and then adds that these feats of arms apparently had not actually been done, but were merely meant tongue-in-cheek in order to whip up the troops. (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 16; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 325; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 249).

"Journal du Siège d'Orléans" has many anecdotes concerning the effect that her presence had on the citizens of Orléans: "And they [the commanders] together concluded that she wouldn't enter Orléans until night, to avoid the commotion of the people... [after she entered] the other soldiers, townsmen and townswomen of Orléans came to welcome her, carrying a great number of torches, and making such joy as if they had seen God descend among them... they already felt themselves entirely comforted, and as if they were [already] liberated, by the divine virtue that they were told was in this simple maiden, whom they regarded most affectionately, equally men, women, as well as little children. And there was a most wondrous press to touch her, or the horse upon which she rode... [the citizens] accompanied her throughout their town and city, rejoicing exceedingly, and escorted her with great honor up to the area near the Renard Gate, to the house of Jacques Boucher... where she was received with great joy, with her two brothers... [on May 1, 1429] Jehanne the Maiden rode through the city, accompanied by many knights and esquires, because those of Orléans had such a great desire to see her, that they nearly broke down the door of the house where she was staying; there was such a great number of people from the city out to see her in the streets where she was passing, that they could pass only with great difficulty, for the people could not get enough of seeing her... [on May 2nd] the Maiden left Orléans on horseback, and went out in the fields to inspect the English fortresses and army; the people streamed after her in a very large multitude, taking great pleasure in being able to see her and be around her." (For the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol IV, pp. 152, 153, 155, 156).

A citizen of Orléans, Jean Luillier, remembered that "... she was received with as much joy and welcome by all people of both sexes, small and great, as if she were an angel of God." (For the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 24; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 331; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 253, and Pernoud's "The Retrial of Joan of Arc", p. 129).

Jean Beauharnais, another citizen, remembered: "...they said that it was a great comfort to associate with her." (For the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 31; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 337; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 259).

Robert de Farciaulx said: "...although many times the commanders held conflicting opinions, due to the great opposition put up by the enemy, nevertheless she steadfastly spoke with them and gave wholesome advice, giving them courage and saying that they should trust in God, and fear nothing, for everything would work out well." (For the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 32; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 338; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", pp. 259 - 260).

Côme de Commy: "I have no doubt that she was sent by God, and it was a marvelous thing to hear her speak and reply; and I never perceived anything in her conduct except holiness and goodness." (For the original language, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, pp. 27 - 28; DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 334; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 256).

Sometimes her ability to inspire led people to venerate her as a living saint, touching her clothing or asking her to touch rosaries and other objects, a practice which bothered her as it could border on idolatry. Inevitably, her accusers would try to allege that she encouraged such veneration of herself, which is not what the eyewitness accounts say on this subject. These include the following:

Marguerite la Touroulde, the wife of her host at Bourges: "I remember that many women came to my house, while Jehanne was staying in it, and brought rosaries and other religious objects so that she might touch them [i.e., to make them holy]; at which Jehanne laughed, saying to me: 'Touch them yourself, for they will be as good from your touch as from mine.'" (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 87. DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 378; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 284).

Jean Barbin: "I heard it said by Master Pierre de Versailles [one of the theologians who had approved her at Poitiers], that when Master Pierre had been at Loches on one occasion in Jehanne's company, some people took hold of her horse's hooves, and kissed her hands and feet. He told Jehanne that she was doing wrong to allow such things, that [such adoration] didn't befit her, saying that she should beware of such things, for it would cause people to commit idolatry. Jehanne replied: 'In truth, I wouldn't be able to protect myself from such things unless God protected me.'" (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, p. 84. DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 376; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 282).

Simon Beaucroix: "Jehanne was greatly pained and displeased that some upright women came to her, wanting to pay respect to her; and this seemed to be a form of adoration, for which she was angry." (For the original language, see: Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, pp. 81 - 82. DuParc's "Procès en Nullité...", Vol I, p. 374; for translations, see Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 281).

She was asked about this type of adoration at her trial, such as in the following excerpts:
From the session on March 3: "Asked whether she did not know full well the feelings of the people of her faction when they kissed her feet and hands, and her clothing: she replied that many people gladly came to see her; nevertheless they kissed her hands as little as she could manage." (In MS 1119, these passages are found on folio 24v lines 3 - 6, 10 - 13: see "Procès de Condamnation...", folio 24v. For a transcription, see Quicherat's "Procès...", Vol III, pp. 101, 102. For translations, see: Oursel's "Les Procès de Jeanne d'Arc", p. 56; Barrett's "The Trial of Jeanne d'Arc", pp. 81-82, 82; For a translation of the same passages in the Orleans Manuscript, see: Scot's "The Trial of Joan of Arc", p. 94).


Copyright © 2003, Allen Williamson. All rights reserved.

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